KHF Outreach
Shedding Light on Youth Issues, Homebound Girls, and Human Rights
13th January 2014
The Information and Research Center is currently working on three projects that intersect a multitude of interconnected issues, such as the rights of women, youth, and poverty. IRC's major work is reaching a critical stage and the coming months will feature several key transitions and launches for IRC projects, including Homebound Girls; "7aqqi" ("My Right”), a free-access database with information in both Arabic and English on human rights issues in Jordan; and the National Youth Survey of Jordan, where for the first time the public can have broad insights on youth civic engagement, political awareness, job readiness after education, and other elements related to their aspirations, perceptions, and opportunities in today's world.

Homebound Girls, a project funded by Save the Children International, is now reaching its final stages after two years of rigorous research about groups of girls under the age of 18 who are not attending school. Preliminary findings show that the cause, problem, and solution to homebound girls is linked to family – many girls have their freedoms taken away by their families once they reach puberty, but it is only with education of and encouragement by families that the prevalence of homebound girls will decrease. 

Similarly, IRC's work with the National Youth Survey of Jordan, a UNICEF-funded project, is nearing completion after over a year of focus groups and the careful creation or survey tools to ensure quality assurance of the research conducted. Soon, the survey tools will be available for the collection by Jordan's Department of Statistics: this important contribution will provide credible and representative information on the diverse issues that Jordanian youth face today. The tools were redeveloped in the context of the post-Arab Spring world, so the survey will provide insight on youth civic engagement, political awareness, job readiness after education, and other elements related to their aspirations, perceptions, and opportunities in today's world. 

Finally, April 2014 will feature the launch of the Database on Human Rights in Jordan – also referred to as "7aqqi" – an information resource that is the first of its kind in the country. The database will be an access-free information hub with the most up-to-date and holistic information in both Arabic and English on human rights issues in Jordan.The aim of the database is not only to provide up-to-date research for everyone, but to combine national and international legislation; research papers, manuals, and policy briefs; and links to relevant media sources and infographics. Once the database is finished with design and development, IRC will begin collecting information and providing access to NGOs toparticipate in this pioneering project, and then will assist in training NGO staff, students, journalists, and other stakeholders in using the database to ensure maximum access to information for all.

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